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What is the situation for men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV in eastern and southern Africa? To what extent are they protected or punished by law; are the right things being done to provide sexual health services; and what are the lessons learned from what has been done to date?

EHPSA commissioned the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) to write an impressionistic account of the scope and range of MSM services across the region, with a particular focus on seven countries - Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.

One of its key contributions lies in its identification of high quality and scalable interventions for appropriate MSM-friendly services. Despite the often unfavourable socio-legal situation, models and examples of HIV prevention, treatment and care services for MSM abound across the region.

Reports

A situational analysis and critical review of sexual health and HIV services for men who have sex with men in eastern and southern Africa. Full report (54pp). Read...

A situational analysis and critical review of sexual health and HIV services for men who have sex with men in eastern and southern Africa. Summary report (11pp). Read...

Evidence Brief

Sexual health and HIV services for men who have sex with men in eastern and southern Africa: a situation analysis (3pp). Read...

Presentations

Presentation at April stakeholder meeting, Pretoria, April 2018:
Critical review of MSM services in eastern and southern Africa. Reygan F. Read...

 

Published in Critical Reviews
Tuesday, 13 February 2018 10:54

STIs, a call to action?

There is a silent global epidemic of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that is threatening to undermine health gains as well as prospects for reaching the Sustainable Development Goals. It seems that insufficient attention is being paid to these diseases that undermine the health of adults and cause congenital abnormalities and death in infants.

Global data from WHO in 2016 shows that there were 357 million cases annually of four curable STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, trichomonas), and around 300,000 foetal and neonatal deaths from syphilis in pregnancy. This latter is more than double the number of AIDS-related deaths in children under the age of 14 years globally, which UNICEF estimates at 120,000 in 2017.


Published in Blog